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in egypt, in syria we don't have a process yet. >> rose: why not? >> because you know, the government is entrenched in a kind of denial position. saying that this is not the arab spring. this is-- . >> rose: terrorist. >> terrorist and conspiracy. >> rose: right. >> from outside. and of course the opposition think of themselves as a revolution. so they are not talking about the same problem. >> rose: and they've got the problem that syrians are killing syrians which always divides a huge mountain to provide. >> a lot of people are angry with me because i have called it civil war. but i'm afraid that is what it is. people were angry with me in baghdad when i said the same thing. so yes, it is, it is, it has a lot of what the revolution has but it has also an aspect of civil war. i think that is what is to be said to the security council sill that you have like in any conflict you have circles. the innercircle which is the locals, the region and the international. >> rose: right. >> security council is, has had a lot of difficulty coming together. yet it is probably the easiest ring to
." representatives of nations putting the squeeze on the syrian government have met all over the world. their latest gathering brought them here to japan. the delegates worked on their strategy to push president bashar al assad out of office and ultimately end the bloodshed. on one hand, they're strengthening sangings. on the other, they're reaffirming their support for opposition forces. nhk world's akira saheki reports. >> reporter: delegates from more than 60 countries are attending the conference, including representatives from the gulf region and the west. they've met several times before, but this is the first time they've gathered in asia. the japanese government hosted the conference to help broaden the base of international support for sanctions against syria. >> translator: the international community has been asking the syrian government to end the violence. but the assad regime is continuing the fight, ignoring the sacrifices of its people. we need to unify our efforts and put pressure on the syrian government. >> reporter: delegates are trying to do just that. they're working to strengt
settlements. >> the german government comes under fire for the alleged plan to sell tanks to saudi arabia's authoritarian rulers. >> happy birthday, sms. it is the 20th anniversary of the text message. >> israeli ambassadors have been summoned to various european capitals to face criticism over israel's plans to build homes in the west bank. the u.s. also slammed the mood as -- move as "especially damaging." >> israel's prime minister remains especially defiant. they announce the plans to build homes on friday in response to the plan to upgrade palestine to a non-member state. in the israeli ambassador -- >> israeli ambassador daniel taub. paris and berlin called in israeli envoys to express their opposition. they say that israel is sending an negative message in the midst of national -- international peace efforts. >> israel is undermining competency -- confidence. >> israel says it will build 3000 settler homes in eastern jerusalem and the west bank. also plans to accelerate construction in the area known as e1. that would further isolate palestinians in east jerusalem from the rest of
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
-missile system to turkey; the massive protest against the government in cairo; paul krugman on the stalemate over taxes and spending; the ongoing cholera epidemic in haiti; and american military leadership. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the borde
? >> reporter: let's show you some of the savings when it comes to government spending. first of all, they put about $600 billion in what the republicans are calling health savings. we understand -- we don't have details. we understand much of that comes from medicare, things that we've heard from republicans over and over like raising the eligibility age, means testing, things like that. so then we have about $600 billion in essentially spending cuts, half from mandatory spending, half from discretionary spending. this is the other very interesting thing that's new. $200 billion from revising the consumer price index. that sounds very technical. but it has very real world consequences because it very much could affect the money, the checks that social security recipients in particular get every single month because it effectively changes inflation so it changes the formula from what they would get. >> significant differences between the white house proposal on this part of the equation as well as on the tax equation. the politics behind this latest republican counterproposal, are they just go
. syrians have the right to choose their government, the president, and any individual to run the world. as these ideologies are conflicting right now, that is normal. we see that in egypt. each side tries to extend its power through institutions, through the constitution. i think this is a healthy discussion, especially after 40 years of dictatorship. the people are not used to sharing their opinions and hearing other opinions. they need some time to be able to reconcile all of the different ideologies. at the end, i believe in the syrian people that they will be able to end the assad regime. >> thank you. i would like to debate on the ideologies and the syrian opposition. i will let you go into this issue. can you talking about the role played by the syrian muslim brotherhood within the opposition. the majority of the seats still being that of the muslim brotherhood. the leaders are close -- what is the role played by them? >> i think the united states has to deal with the reality with the rise of muslim brotherhood and the whole region, not only in to nietzsche, egypt. the difference
: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place for assad to go. s
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
, sovereign nations and the leaders from various states began to realize we need a stronger federal government so they wrote the constitution. many americans were opposed to the constitution and became antifederalists. so they were the federalists and antifederalists opposed to each other from the very beginning. from the signing of the constitution. the antifederalists gradually became known as republicans and then democrat republicans. so when john quincy adams was running for office, and you now have the republicans, democrats republicans running against the federalist and he was the last of the federalist. the federalists ran this country from the beginning. washington, adams and they were the people that ran the country in the elite, the constitutional and the states allow property owners to vote. gradually universal suffrage came, not involving women. don't get your hopes up too high. it was white male suffrage but you didn't have to be a property owner and that is what pushed of the elite out of power. adams says jefferson, monroe, all the plantation owners and elite leaders permitted t
and do share the opinion that the existing government in syria should carry out its functions, but time has shown its task is beyond its strength. back in washington, a spokesman for secretary clinton warned of the perils that the syrian people would confront even in a post assad era. >> we know these groups, al-qaeda and others, troy to take advantage of the environment assad has fostered over the last year or so. it is important that they -- that the syrian people get a government out of all of this that is representative of their desires and as separations. they -- aspirations. they don't want to trade one for the other. >> that has been a concern for u.s. policy makers in all of these mideast countries affected by the arab spring. >> what secretary clinton and most others are hoping is president assad will step down. any indication that might happen? >> judging on the pro nuns ments of his -- pronouncements of his top aids, no. they call the talk a pretext for foreign intervention. he equated the regime's potential use with suicide. >> the messages i conveyed from to the leaders of
this to a c.e.o. in the crowd. so maybe david, you could take this. what role should the government play in the future of -- your business is transportation, too -- in the transportation business with this? look, we are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equi
in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just passed tax cuts for the middle class americans and then fight later on for spending cuts and increasing taxes for the wealthy? caller: the tax cut for the general population is great. that would be good for stimulating the economy. but the big thing is hit there needs to be a balanced plan. we need more revenue and we need less spending at the federal level. what is good for california is not good for virginia and what's good for virginia is not good for maryland. maybe we need to focus on reducing the federal government overview. been there would not be as much spending or taxes needed. then let the states deal with the taxes they need to take care of their citizens. host: robert, milwaukee, democratic caller. caller: i would like to say that the republican party, not all of them, i think it's just the tea party, they are destroying the republi
, more conflict between them. >> the syrian government is under increasing pressure tonight. the american and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most p
. >> the syrian government is under increasing pressure tonight. the american and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, c
, of course, had seized a number of military bases, government military bases and looted the weapons, taken the weapons from those to help arm their arsenals. rather than stay and occupy those bases, however, they've withdrawn knowing the syrian air force could attack those sites. so in recent weeks, the momentum seems to have swung the rebels' way, but right now analysts are very cautious in trying to predict what a tipping point could be for the fall of the regime overall. >> rose: and what happens if it falls? >> absolutely. and what steps next would we take. would assad retreat to the hills in an enclave of some sort, taking some of his chemical weapons with him? would there be some kind of political deal, some brokered deal to get him out of the country? right now many of these are some of the options that the u.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relat
gets automatic tax increases from everybody, more government money from the private sector. he gets big cuts in the military, which he also wants. and if anything goes wrong, he blames the republicans. i don't think he cares. either way from his perspective he's a winner. if he was looking for a deal, he would be dealing. he's not dealing. he's campaigning. stuart: you say if we go over the cliff, he wins. if we go with his plan, he wins. no way he loses on this situation. liz: fiscal cliff diving at the 11th hour -- i hate the cliches, i'm tired of them but we will see an 11th hour deal on december 24th, christmas eve or new year's eve in the dead of night. i'm worried about that. a very bad deal no one will have read. stuart: i think there might be a deal at the very last minute in which the republicans say okay higher tax rates on people making more than a half million and we'll talk about spending cuts at some point in the future. david: i think there's a 50/50 chance there won't be a deal. stuart: that's why the dow industrials are doing nothing because nobody knows what's going to
government in the nation of mali, our ally. this may seem inconsequential to the average american, but it could have big implications for our security as well as that of our regional and global allies. because in the power vacuum that was created in that spring coup, al qaeda saw an opportunity and they stepped in. three different extremist groups all linked to or controlled by al qaeda in the islamic magra known as aqim now control an area the size of texas in the northern part of mali. they succeeded in fracturing a formerly stable democracy and contributing to broad security, political and humanitarian crises that i believe have grave implications for the region and for america's interests. to put it simply, mr. president, this matters. mali, a relatively strong democracy for more than two decades, is now embroiled in turmoil. the united states in partnership with the international community must show leadership in helping it rebuild its democracy and restore its territorial integrity by reclaiming it from terrorists. so thi this morninges as the chr of the african chair subcom
government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professor reason is probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary or, on the 17th which is, widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers, but, you know, our assessment is that their desire to continue down this road is motivated by their desire to ensure that their capability, they are now a self-proclaimed nuclear state, their ability to be able to demonstrate to the world that they have the capacity to be able to build missile and have in the technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this as i said earlier would be very destabilizing i think to not only to the region, but to the international security environment. so who's helping them and my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time, in such a short perio
to punish russian officials accused of human rights offenses-- a move the russian government has denounced. the house passed the legislation last month. president obama has pledged to sign it into law. it was all smiles today for the duchess of cambridge, as she left a london hospital. the former kate middleton was discharged after being treated for severe morning sickness. the duchess emerged with her husband, prince william, three days after being admitted. the hospital stay prompted royal officials to announce her pregnancy to the public. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first f
, a bloomberg government former members of both parties said negotiators should be able to reach an agreement. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at the business roundtable, followed by news conferences with house speaker john boehner and minority leader nancy pelosi. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of six-three, i believe, and they will say that is precedent. indiana had a voter i.d. -- >> they decided on the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish id they did not say all of that was subsequently -- >> they talked about indiana. you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people voter i.d. loss disproportionately affect minorities -- implies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. as -- if white americans can get id to vote and go through all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left.
: egypt's rush to draft a new constitution has sparked backlash against the government. tahrir square is packed with tens of thousands of egyptians protesting against their president morsi and his assembly after they approved a draft of the new constitution. they did it but any christians, no liberals, no moderate muslims, because they left the body in protest. they claim that the assembly is bent on passing laws that restricts speech and women's rights and the draft come as week after president morsi gave himself unchecked control over the country. he made himself a dictator. he claims it is "temporary" in order to promote stability. steve harrigan is live in cairo. what is the draft constitution? >>reporter: well, opposition figures including the nobel peace prize laureate is calling the constitution a coup against democracy. they are sharply criticizing it as a rush drive, 16 hours of voting on a constitution, pushing it through only after all moderates, liberals and christians have left the room in protest. right now it stands to go to referendum in 15 days but the anger against i
to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. they're allowed to hang onto a small portion of their profits. >> yeah. that is actually not really accurate. there have been numbers of studies, most recently from the organisation for economic co-operation and development but also last year we saw a bill proposed in congress from senator sanders and representative ellison, all of which identify over $10 billion annually that are going to the fossil fuel industry in subsidies. i'm a father too. melissa: congress doesn't have any money. they don't have money to give. the money they have have is my money that they have taken from me. it is company's money they have paid in. it is tax revenue. >> it is our money. melissa: hanging on to earnings, these are deductions rather than sending in even more tax dollars they're paying less tax based on investments they're making. you're calling those things subsidies. that is not congress's money. that is exxon's money it is hanging on to. but they're not taking money back. they're hanging onto the money they have earned. do you und
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
just government, and too much of it. here he is in a clip from the 2006 documentary "1%." >> in the end we'd end up worse off. it would do harm not good. people don't pay those high taxes, they find ways of getting around it. you're never going to be able to stop them from finding ways to get around it. jenna: talking a little bit about taxes there. my next guest has written extensively about milton freidman. we wanted to ask him, what would milton do, one of the greatest economists. nobel peace prize winning economist. we have the author of the inch dense pensable milton freidman. what would he think about all of this. >> great to be with you. i'm sure if milton freidman were here today, he'd say go over the fiscal cliff. jenna: straight over it? don't even press on the brakes. >> it's always worthwhile to meet and have negotiations. at the end ever the day he favored the least government spending possible. i believe he would have said that is a course that isn't going to be accomplished by raising taxes, rather by raising taxes that will provide funding for more government spending. f
-evaluation. conservatism is an asset, not a liability, as we try to govern this country in the 21st century. and i look forward to staying in touch with jim and to working with him at the heritage foundation to see what we can do to improve the fate of our country so we will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i
are better off, they pay more in taxes. the government can pay for the usual things and pay down the debt. president clinton, the surplus, he got that partly from raising revenue. raising taxes. but also he did it in a way that grew the economy and the nation prospered and the debt became no big deal and then the debt was gone and the debt clocks that were supposed to be scary got shut off. that was because of prioritizing economic growth and being willing to raise revenues. look when we started growing again after the recession. it was not long after the stimulus kicked in. the government spent money and the economy grew. that's how it works. that's why it used to be a beltway consensus when the economy needed to e grow, you needed economic stimulus in terms of your fiscal policy. now the discussion about how we need to make sure we contract the economy and cause as much pain as possible to the people who will be hurt the most by that contracting, maybe that makes sense on sunday morning, but the rest of us go to work during the week and sometimes we go to parties. right now as we speak,
oyster company at point reyes national seashore today sued the federal government for the right it to stay in that park. owners of the drake's bay oyster company are angry that the interior secretary has refused to renew their special use permit to operate the company inside the park. the suit claims the government's environmental impact review violated federal rules and failed to provide enough public notice. park service staff claim the oyster company endangers the wild nature of point reyes national seashore. >>> the strange saga of john mca fee continues today with word he is in guatemala seeking asylum. the anti-virus software founder posted a message on his blog today saying he escaped from belize. he says he is meeting with guatemalan officials today and if all goes well he'll do a press conference tomorrow. authorities in belize want to talk to him as a pen of interest in the murder of his neighbor. he claims he's innocent. >>> sonoma county firefighters are work to be determine the cause of a fire that left a house a total loss. crews from twelve agencies raced to stadl
out of denmark. >> i mean, in the sense of the new government cut off my funding. stuart: because of your position on global warming and environmentalism. >> yes we don't want to it hear good advice. stuart: what's your advice on the carbon tax, if we got one, would it help reduce co 2 emissions? >> well, any climate economist would say a low carbon tax makes sense, but the problem is, it will only cut a very tiny amount and of course, what you really have to remember, you're never going to get china or india on board. so essentially, it's going to have a very, very small effect. it's not the solution to climate change. >> would you say that the co 2 emissions are causing temperatures globally to rise. >> yes. >> and that's accurate? >> and in the long run, we do need to cut back on carbon emissions, but the way that we're trying right now, the way that we're trying in doha and many international areas is not working and we're essentially making up these promises, but what are we doing? we're sending productions to china and india, so essentially we're putting out more co 2, but n
's iconic tahrir square. speaking out against the new proposed constitution. the government infamous majority rushed to approve it before a court could stop them as christian and secular members boycotted a vote walked right out of the hall. activists say the measure could limit civil lishedz in a big way. among other things increases the influence of sharia law and commits the state to protecting morlgs and the quote traditional family. the document does strengthen bans on torture and arbitrary arrests. also curbs executive power and pliments presidential terms. this comes just after the president there mohammed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers basically made himself a dictator. that's what first triggered the protests and less than two years after the fall of egypt's aauthoritarian leader hosni mom bark many egyptians fear their new leader and islamist allies are putting the country back on the path toward dictatorship. steve harrigan live in cairo. steve, any sign the president is willing to concede on any of this? shepard, president morsey has made no moves on compromise
increases. we're saying it now like it's normal. 25% of gdp for government spending and you've got bloated government already, you start there. you start at government spending. you don't immediately start spending another 50 billion in stimulus. >> that's going to be the question that boehner has to deal with. the president will have to deal with the far wings of his party. boehner started doing it. did you see they removed two tea party members from the budget committee? >> i don't want to raise taxes to fund 25% of gdp. >> and actually, the american taxpayers are being told to pay their fair share. they want to see real entitlement reform as well. but you have to deal with the issue on the table. i mean, the spending right now is a percentage of gdp is 24%. it's projected to go substantially higher. do you know that medicare and medicaid didn't exist 50 years ago and they're now a quarter of the federal budget? >> i know. it was supposed to be supplemental. david walker was on the other day talking about obama care which is supposed to save us a trillion dollars and the actual cost, wha
is going to be done down the road by the government. i don't know anyone who would ever believe such a promise. i don't expect that the republicans would accept that offer from the president. i just don't see that as ever happening in the city. let me ask you -- >> i'm sorry. republicans basically have to say our principles here are correct. our whole analysis of the economy is correct. we need massive spending decreases, and they've got to stick with that. if they can get decent spending increases and have to agree to additional revenue, fine. if they get pushed in the position the president is trying to push them, they stick with their principles, you know, and a year and a half from now go to the electorate with that. it worked in 10. it will probably work in 14. it will be a shame because it will do a lot of damage to our economy in between, but the president has that really on his shoulders. he's the leader. >> greta: mayor, thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> greta: breaking news out of syria. the syrian government mixing components for the deadly sarin nerve gas. the ranking
or the republican future. they honored jack kemp last night. marco rubio thing that limited government is the way to strengthen the middle class. and congressman paul ryan urging fellow republicans reach out to a broader group of american. >> this is essentially divide americans into our voters and their voters. to be clear. republicans plus dear need to steer far clear of that. [applause] we must speak to the aspirations of every american. i believe that we can turn on the incidence of upper mobility. it will require a bold departure from the approach government has taken over the last five decades. jenna: let's talk to rick perry. governor, what do you think about that. >> a full departure think you agree with that? >> for many years we have been working with folks on both sides of the aisle. we have been reaching out. i did 40% of the hispanic vote. it is one that i have bought during the presidential nominating process. we need to be talking about economic issues. we need to be talking about faith and family and how you strengthen those. how you strengthen an economy. i will suggest that we t
christmas and new year's. they do understand how serious this is. that's what they're elect to do, govern, e. jon: matt, what i've seen own sunday shows both sides are hardening. >> i worked for a president who faced challenges when he went into his re-election with hurricane katrina. what can happen at beginning of second term, we saw this with ronald reagan, we've seen it with so many presidents, their second terms seem to be a little bit of disappointment, don't live up to what they accomplish in the first term. one of the problems with president obama he rolled out of this election thinking he won the election, he can can set the terms of conversation. he needs to remember the republicans control the house of representatives. they understand their political fate is tied to working with the president and being bipartisan. there are certain things they >> first of all, let me say that republicans and democrats have to stop drawing lines in the sand. they have to get in a room and talk to each other. we'll have to make difficult decisions. we have to increase revenue and we have to reduce g
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